St. Louis Brown Recluse

If its summer then its Brown Recluse Season!

If its summer and you live in Missouri, then you have brown recluse spiders whether you see them or not.  It’s just a matter of time before they let you see them.

With all the buzz and the discussion about the discovery of a brown recluse spider in a (Kansas City Missouri) woman’s ear, we thought it was a good time to bring back some of our past blogs about the education and prevention of brown recluse spiders.

This year, the weather has played a significant role in bring the brown recluse spiders into our homes early. With the enormous amount of rain throughout the summer months, not only have the brown recluse been seeking shelter, but other pests and insects have too.

With fall approaching and the weather getting cooler, this will start pushing the pests and insects inside our homes.

Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions suggests having your attic, pipe chases, cracks and crevasses dusted yearly.  Spraying, monitors and routine pest control services will keep the numbers down significantly.  Please call us at 314 544-7378 (PEST) to speak with one of our Customer Service Reps who will be happy to explain our Year-Round Service Programs with you.

Learn more about brown recluse spiders from our blogs below:

 

 

 

 

orb-weaver-web

What kind of Spider did I see?

Have you seen me lately? I’m an Orb Weaver Spider and I look like this…

orb-weaverNormally, all you hear about are the Brown Recluse Spiders here in the St. Louis area. But, today we are going to talk about the Orb Weaver Spider.
Unlike the Brown Recluse, that lives mostly indoors, the Orb Weaver is an outside spider. Typically, you don’t see them until mid-September, but with all the rain, they are out early and in full force!
Orb Weavers vary in colors, sizes and shapes. The most common Orb Weaver here in the St. Louis area is the one pictured above. This Orb Weaver will have bands around its legs. The webs of orb weavers consist of radial strands, like spokes of a wheel and concentric circles. Most build their webs vertically, attaching them to branches, stems or manmade structures. Webs may be quite large, spanning several feet in width.

Most orb weavers are nocturnal. During the daylight hours, the spider may retreat to a nearby branch or leaf but will spin a trapline from the web. Any slight vibration of the web will travel down the trapline. The orb weaver possesses venom, which is used to immobilize her prey.
When threatened by people or most anything larger than itself, an orb weaver’s first response is to flee. Rarely, if handled, it will bite, but the bite is mild.

The Orb Weaver Diet

Like all spiders, orb weavers are carnivores. They feed primarily on insects and other small organisms entrapped in their sticky webs. Some larger orb weavers may even consume hummingbirds or frogs!

Orb Weaver Life Cycle

Male orb weavers occupy most of their time with finding a mate. Most males are much smaller than the females and after mating he may become her next meal! The female waits on or near her web, letting the males come to her. She lays eggs in clutches of several hundred, encased in a sac. During the winter, the female orb weaver will lay a large clutch in the fall and wrap it in thick silk. She will die when the first frost arrives, leaving her babies to hatch in the spring. Orb weavers live one to two years, on average.

Want to keep your home or business pest and animal free? Have one of our Certified Building Analyst come out and do a Bansill inspection and learn how to keep pest and animals out while maintaining the efficiency of your home.
We take pride in helping to solve all your pest and animal problems. That’s why “solutions” is part of our name! Find out the difference in St. Louis pest control, call us today at 314-544-7378 and learning more about how we can give you “Peace of Mind”!

spider-mites

Spider Mites to Brown Recluse Spiders

Recently, many web browsers have been curious about Spider Mites.   Many people want to know if they bite, are they harmful to humans or pets and how do you get rid of them?

Well, fear no more, I am here to tell you that Spider Mites (as creepy crawly as that sounds) will not bite humans or animals.  Spider mites feed on plants (sorry plants).

Spider mites are members of the Acari (mite) family. They are less than 1mm in size and vary in color. They generally live on the undersides of leaves on plants, where they may spin protective silk webs, and they can cause damage by puncturing the plant cells to feed.  They get the “spider” part of their common name from this webbing.

The other spider being goggled recently is the Brown Recluse Spider aka “Violin Spider”, because it looks like it has a violin on its back.  It is very common in the St. Louis area, but even where they are common, people don’t often find them.  The Brown Recluse prefers quiet nooks and crannies in buildings and woodlands.

Brown Recluse spiders hide in storage areas that are dark and undisturbed for long periods.  They are in your house because they can find insects to eat there.  To reduce the chance of contact with these creatures, keep usually undisturbed areas free of clutter.  Like all spiders, a Brown Recluse avoids human contact.

Brown recluses are not nearly as fearsome looking as harmless wolf spiders, which are bigger and bulkier.  In fact, the Brown recluse might go entirely unnoticed, except that its bite can cause people serious medical problems.

The bite of the Brown Recluse is usually not felt, but symptoms may develop 5-12 hours later, in the form of chills and a fever.  The area of the bite may discolor and medical complications including disfiguring wounds may occur.  Medical attention is advised!

If you see one Brown recluse spider or suspect you have an infestation, you need to call the Brown Recluse experts…Holper’s Pest & Animal Solution at 314 544-7378.  Let our spider exterminators give you back your home and give you peace of mind!

We have written many blogs about Missouri spiders.  If you would like to learn more about them,  read:

St. Louis Brown Recluse

Are There Poisonous Spiders in Missouri?

It’s bad enough to think about spiders in your house and yard, but have you wondered if they are dangerous, in addition to just having an extreme “ick” factor? Are there poisonous spiders in Missouri?

The simple answer is yes–there are two types of spiders in Missouri that people refer to as poisonous. But in truth only one has venom, and it is the extremely rare black widow spider. Luckily for those of us in the St. Louis area, this is not the part of the state one would usually find this rare spider.

That’s not to say that St. Louis gets away from the dangerous spider game unscathed–St. Louis is a virtual hotbed for the brown recluse spider. And they are at a peak right now. When a brown recluse bites you, it secretes a protein into the wound that many people have an extreme sensitivity to. This leads to the misnomer “poisonous” being attached to the brown recluse spider. Many people actually have no more reaction to a brown recluse bite than to any other spider bite–only 10% of brown recluse spider bites even require medical attention!

We have written many blogs about the brown recluse. If you want to learn more about how to identify a brown recluse spider, and how to get rid of an infestation, read: How Do I Get Rid of Brown Recluse Spiders?

Insect & Spider Control

Wolf Spider vs. Brown Recluse Spider: Are You Misidentifying The Dangerous One?

We have written many times in this blog about brown recluse spiders, as getting rid of them successfully is one of the things Holper’s is known for! We are seeing many types of spiders right now, but this stretch of heat makes it the prime time of year for brown recluse spiders. Yet, because of their relatively innocuous appearance (in relation to some others) many people are mistaken when identifying which spider they have. When it comes to wolf spider vs. brown recluse spider, are you misidentifying the dangerous one?

Wolf Spiders 

wolf spider

Wolf Spider (https://infowpb.com/wolf-spider/)

A wolf spider certainly has the creepy factor going for it! Up to two inches in size, these large, hairy spiders, with eight eyes in three rows, definitely look ominous. Luckily, these looks are generally deceiving, as wolf spiders typically only bite when threatened. Admittedly, it is hard to get past that menacing exterior, leading many people to misidentify the hairy, scary-looking wolf spider as the brown recluse, which is of much more concern at this time of the year.

Brown Recluse Spiders 

Brown Recluse

A brown recluse spider doesn’t have the fright factor that a hairy, wolf spider does.  Brown recluse spiders range from the size of a dime to the size of a dollar coin. They are light tan to gray in color, with thin, spindly legs. Their well-known identifier is the violin-shaped marking on the top of the head, which is why many people refer to it as a fiddleback spider. Many people fear the brown recluse, and the reason is the bite! The bite of a brown recluse injects the victim with a protein that affects different people in different ways. Some have no reaction at all. But for an unlucky person who does react, the bite can lead to necrosis, organ failure, and, in rare cases, death. Knowing this, it is easy to see why you don’t want to misidentify your spiders! If you want to read more about brown recluse spiders, see our recent blog, Where Do Brown Recluse Spiders Live? 

Wolf Spider vs. Brown Recluse Spider: Now What Do I Do?

Regardless of which spider you have identified, you’re going to need an expert who can attack your infestation problem with a multi-phased approach, particularly in the case of brown recluse spiders. Even if you have misidentified which spider you have (or prefer not to get close enough to even try to identify it!) our technicians know the difference and are ready to help rid your home of pests. More importantly, our team will help you keep it that way with ongoing pest control.

Call Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions at 314-732-1413, and reclaim your home from those spiders, or any kind of pest that is bothering you. Your home really does deserve Holper’s!

 

Insect & Spider Control

Where Do Brown Recluse Spiders Live?

Here in St. Louis, most of the insects and spiders that take up residence in our homes and businesses are merely pests–while we don’t like to see them, they really can’t harm us personally. We just don’t want them around. But the brown recluse spider is a different story. Why are people afraid of finding brown recluse spiders? Where do brown recluse spiders live? How do you get rid of brown recluse spiders?

Why Are People Afraid of Finding Brown Recluse Spiders?

First, it is important to know what to look for so you’ll know if you see one. Brown recluse spiders range from dime-sized to the size of a dollar coin. They can be tan to gray in color, with thin, spindly legs. They are easiest to identify by the violin-shaped marking on the top of the head, leading some people to call it a fiddleback spider. The reason people fear the brown recluse spider is the bite! The bite of a brown recluse injects a victim with a protein that affects different people in different ways. Some lucky ones have no reaction at all. But for an unlucky person who does react, the bite can lead to necrosis, organ failure, and, in extremely rare cases, death.

So…Where Do Brown Recluse Spiders Live? 

The name itself, brown recluse, is a clue. Reclusive in nature, these spiders like to live in wall voids and attics. They usually come out at night to feed, which leads to an increased likelihood of spotting one while it is out hunting for insects. Sometimes you can find them in sinks, bathtubs, and shower stalls when they fall out of the light fixtures above, which they access from the attic. Though they prefer to stay hidden, occasionally you can see one crawling along baseboards, or high up on a wall near the ceiling.

How Do You Get Rid of Brown Recluse Spiders? 

Holper’s is widely known throughout the industry as brown recluse experts. Many companies come to Holper’s to learn how to effectively treat this potentially deadly pest.  Remember that you learned brown recluse like to live in wall voids? Most companies don’t treat the wall voids, and if you don’t treat the wall voids, you can’t exterminate the brown recluse! With Holper’s, part of the treatment includes miniscule ports that allow those wall voids to be dusted, targeting the brown recluse where they live. You will  benefit by trusting Holper’s, as our multi-phase treatment plan utilizes the newest formulations and technologies available to professionals. Call Holper’s today at 314-732-1413 and a member of our Customer Care Team will be happy to schedule you.

You can trust Holper’s–we know how to kill brown recluse spiders. Let us give you back your home!

 

 

 

 

 

wolf spider

The Little Boy Who Cried Wolf Spider

wolf spider

Image from https://infowpb.com/wolf-spider/

We all know the story of the little boy who cried wolf. I think it’s safe to say that the same little boy, if he came upon a wolf spider, might cry out, too–but in horror. Wolf spiders elicit a particularly strong response to their appearance, and it isn’t positive. What are wolf spider facts? And more importantly, how do we kill them?

Wolf Spider Facts: How To Identify a Wolf Spider 

A wolf spider carries a significant profile. Ranging from nickel-sized to half-dollar-sized, a wolf spider is a brown, fuzzy spider with a white stripe down the middle of the back. The legs are thick, brown, and fuzzy, too. The webs they spin can be large and elaborate. All of these things lead to an imposing impression when first seen.

In truth, wolf spiders are actually harmless. They look terrifying, but they pose no threat. Even so, nobody likes spiders around their homes and family, so most people include them in the list of pests they want to kill.

wolf-spiderWolf Spider Control: How To Prevent Wolf Spiders

Prevention is a professional application of a power spray to the exterior of the home. Autumn is an especially good time to start this preventative service to take care of wolf spiders, as well as all other occasional invaders that like to use your home as a refuge.

Who Can Kill My Wolf Spiders?

If you want wolf spider control, call on Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions! Our wolf spider killers will take care of wolf spiders and other seasonal pests with the most up-to-date materials and equipment available. With over thirty years of caring for St. Louis area homes, Holper’s will give you peace of mind with successful wolf spider control.

Call 314-732-1413 today for your appointment!

Insect & Spider Control

How Do I Get Rid of Brown Recluse Spiders?

Nobody wants to discover brown recluse spiders in their home. Spiders are one of the most hated and feared pests. Add to that the potentially dangerous nature of a brown recluse bite, and you have a stressful situation. You’ll want to find a spider exterminator who knows how to get rid of brown recluse spiders.

What’s So Bad About a Brown Recluse Spider?

Brown Recluse ControlBrown recluse spiders range from the size of a dime to the size of a dollar coin.  They are light tan to gray in color, with thin, spindly legs. Their well-known identifier is the violin-shaped marking on the top of the head. The bite of a brown recluse injects the victim with a protein that affects in different ways. Lucky people and pets have no reaction at all. But for those unlucky ones that do react, the bite can lead to necrosis, organ failure, and in rare cases, death.

Signs of a Serious Infestation

Brown recluse spiders, left unchecked, will eventually take over the structure they are inhabiting.  The ways to know that the population in your home or business has reached infestation-level numbers are:

  • You begin to see them during the day.
  • You see large numbers of them at night.
  • You find poorly-defined (abstract) webs in the rafters of the basement with empty spider body casings.
  • You find them in closets among your clothing and folded linens.
  • You find them behind pictures on the wall.
  • You find six or more in two weeks’ time.

Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions = Your Spider Exterminators!

Holper’s is widely known throughout the industry as brown recluse experts. (Many companies come to Holper’s to learn how to effectively treat this potentially deadly pest!) Your benefit in trusting Holper’s is our multi-phase treatment plan utilizing the newest formulations and technologies available to professionals. Call Holper’s today at 314-732-1413 and a member of our Customer Care Team will be happy to schedule you.

You can trust Holper’s–we know how to get rid of brown recluse spiders. Let our spider exterminators give you back your home.

 

 

 

BrownRecluse

Along Came a Spider…How To Kill Brown Recluse Spiders

One of the alarming things homeowners can experience is the discovery that they are sharing their home with brown recluse spiders. Spiders in general are one of the most hated, and often feared, pests. Compound that with the potentially dangerous nature of a brown recluse bite, and you have a situation fraught with stress and concern for safety. It is an almost immediate reaction to wonder how to kill brown recluse spiders.

Spiders 101

In the Greater St. Louis area, there are three main species of spiders that dwell inside of structures. The first is the common house spider. This is a small spider, usually no larger than a nickel, light tan in color, with no markings.  The second spider is the wolf spider. While this spider, with its hairy and menacing physical appearance, looks harmful, in actuality it is harmless. Neither of these two types of spiders bite. The third species found in our area is the dreaded brown recluse spider, which is not uncommon to find in your home or business.

What’s So Bad About a Brown Recluse Spider?

brown-recluse-spider-quarter-size

Brown recluse spiders range from the size of a dime to the size of a dollar coin. They are light tan to gray in color, with thin, spindly legs. Their well-known identifier is the violin-shaped marking on the top of the head, which is why many people refer to it as a fiddleback spider. Many people fear the brown recluse, and the reason is the bite! The bite of a brown recluse injects the victim with a protein that affects different people in different ways. Some have no reaction at all. But for an unlucky person who does react, the bite can lead to necrosis, organ failure, and, in rare cases, death.

Signs of a Serious Infestation

Brown-recluse-spidersBrown recluse spiders, left unchecked, will eventually take over the structure they are inhabiting. The ways to know that the population in your home or business has reached infestation-level numbers are:

  • You begin to see them during the day.
  • You see large numbers of them at night.
  • You find poorly-defined (abstract) webs in the rafters of the basement with empty spider body casings.
  • You find them in closets among your clothing and folded linens.
  • You find them behind pictures on the wall.
  • You find six or more in two weeks’ time.

Why Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions Knows How to Kill Brown Recluse Spiders

Holper’s is widely known throughout the industry as brown recluse experts. Many companies come to Holper’s to learn how to effectively treat this potentially deadly pest. Your benefit in trusting Holper’s is our multi-phase treatment plan utilizing the newest formulations and technologies available to professionals. Call today for your FREE consultation to bring you peace of mind about what is co-dwelling in your home. Call Holper’s today at 314-732-1413 and a member of our Customer Care Team will be happy to schedule you.

You can trust Holper’s–we know how to kill brown recluse spiders. Let us give you your home back.

spider-control

Spider Control: Signs You Need the Help of an Exterminator

Spiders. For some homeowners, the word itself inspires terror. Could spiders hide in your clothes and bite you when you slip them on? Could the bite be poisonous and require medical treatment? Could spiders in your home proliferate until the residence looks like a creepy set from the Hollywood film Arachnophobia? The answer to all of these questions is yes. That’s why it’s important to call a spider control specialist if you notice signs of a spider problem.

Signs of a Spider Problem

Most house spiders are relatively shy and don’t try to search you out. So, when it comes to determining whether you have a spider problem, you’ll need to keep an eye out for them. There could be several indicators that you need the help of a spider control specialist, but some of them — particularly the four listed below — tend to be present more frequently than others.

  1. Spiders Along Your Baseboards

Because spiders are discrete by nature, they often travel through homes using paths that make them tough to notice. One of the most common paths arachnids travel is along baseboards. If you notice a preponderance of live spiders or dead ones along your baseboards, it could indicate they have a nest in your home and are out foraging for food.

  1. Spider Webs in Multiple Corners

It’s common for spider webs to occasionally appear in the corners of a home, but if your home has active webs in multiple corners — and the webs keep reappearing after you knock them down — you may have a spider problem. A single female spider can birth hundreds of offspring in a short period of time, meaning all it can take is a single egg sac to kick off an infestation.

  1.   Spider Bites

spider-bitesSpider bites do occur, but they are a fairly uncommon occurrence.  Spiders are not aggressive, so when bites do happen it is sometimes because a person has picked up an item with a spider on it.  Many times people will wake up to find they have been bitten while sleeping. (However, if you are waking to find multiple bites, that would be a sign of other biting insects, such as fleas or bedbugs.)  A bite from a spider will be a single bite, not a group of bites.  In the Greater St. Louis region brown recluse spiders are prevalent.  The bite of a brown recluse spider is one that always warrants a visit to the doctor, as it is potentially dangerous, and it rare cases, fatal.

  1. Nests Found During Construction

Some spiders — particularly brown recluses — prefer to nest in out of the way places in the interior of a home, such as inside walls, under subfloors, and in ceilings. In some cases, the nests are discovered during residential construction that disturbs these areas. If construction workers find a spider nest, your next phone call should be to a spider control specialist.

Need Help With Spider Control?

If so, give us a call at (314) 732-1413, or email us at info@holperspest.com, to set up a free inspection. We’ll determine what type of spiders are in your home, whether they infest the structure or are simply present in a few specific places, and propose a plan for eradicating the problem, including recommendations for securing your home’s exterior against spider entry.

Spiders in homes are a nuisance, but they can also be dangerous to homeowners and their pets, depending on the poisonousness of their bite. With summer just around the corner and an increase in insect activity on its way, now is the time to take care of a spider control problem before it intensifies. Contact us today to get started on controlling your residential spider problem.