squirrel-problem

Four Ways to Avoid Handling Squirrel Problems in Your Home

A house is a person’s castle, as the saying goes. However, no matter how much your home resembles a royal residence, it certainly won’t feel like one if you’re dealing with a squirrel problem. Many homeowners initially address a squirrel problem by laying traps and bait that are meant for mice and rats. When these methods don’t work, and the homeowners do a little reading on the internet, they often arrive at the right conclusion: squirrel problems are to blame.

What Not to Do About Squirrel Problems
Over the years, frustrated homeowners who have dealt with squirrel problems in their residence have tried hundreds of methods for getting rid of the creatures — and some of the strategies work better than others. In this entry, we highlight four, do-it-yourself squirrel elimination tactics that are highly inefficient at solving the problem. If you are thinking about using one of the following squirrel removal strategies, don’t. Instead, call Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions.

1) Shooting at Squirrels
You may have a nice hunting rifle you’ve been itching to use, but keep the firearm locked in your gun case if you’re thinking about taking the vigilante approach to squirrel removal and firing bullets. Hunting rifles and other high-powered guns don’t make good home defense options because their ammo is often strong enough to blast through the walls of the average home. Unless you’re trying to exterminate your neighbor, too, save the gun for your next hunting trip.

2) Heating Up the Attic
If you seal off vents to your attic in the warm season, it will eventually kill any squirrels that are there. It will also risk damaging any HVAC equipment located in the attic by causing it to overheat. In addition, once the squirrels are dead, you’ll have the unenviable task of removing their carcasses. Either that, or leave the decaying animals where they are and deal with the stench of decomposition wafting from the attic. Neither option is a good one, to say the least.

3) Using Rat Poison
Rat poison works great for killing rats, but it’s important to remember that the product is designed to attract rats and not squirrels. In other words, trying to kill squirrels with a poison that doesn’t draw them in only means that you’ll waste money on the product and still have squirrel problems. The best thing that could happen is that you might end up killing a few rats that you didn’t know were in your home. After the rats die, the squirrels will just keep up their obnoxious behavior.

4) Using a Cat to Kill
Some cats chase after squirrels as quickly as they pursue mice, rats, birds, and other small animals. So, it seems reasonable to think that they might attack squirrels, too. Yet, if your home has serious squirrel problems, there are probably quite a few squirrels running around in the structure. Consequently, using a house cat to try to eliminate them becomes a problem of logistics. Besides, most house cats aren’t accustomed to being killing machines. If they were, you probably wouldn’t have to set out those big bowls of water and food that they depend on.

Contact an Exterminator
Unfortunately, many homeowners who have squirrel problems only contact us after they have tried bad squirrel extermination methods that range from dangerous to wacky. The best way to address a squirrel infestation in your home is to call Holper’s Pest & Animal Solutions. To solve your squirrel problem, call us at (314) 732-1413, or email us at info@holperspest.com.